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How to Start a Military Surplus Store

Surplus Military Store Antique Gas Mask

Surplus military gear offers quite an interesting means toward profit for the aspiring small-business owner. Such items commonly available through military surplus sales are exceedingly popular among the general population. Most people have the impression that items manufactured for military use are just built better than similar items destined for general consumer trade. It’s understood, by most people, that military gear is put through much harsher wear and tear than most civilian merchandise, and, as such, it is expected to stand up to such conditions well and still provide a long and useful life-span. People believe the military is excessively demanding when it comes to the quality of manufacturing of the gear they use, and that the military is willing to spare no expense in obtaining such items.

For this reason, surplus military merchandise sort of comes pre-equipped with a fair dose of very effective sales-hype. If you don’t believe me, you could see it for yourself. Go to your nearest military surplus store and, if they have them in stock, purchase the cheapest, oldest, rattiest looking, olive-drab military field jacket they have for sale. Then, obtain the absolute most expensive consumer available sporting field jacket from the manufacturer with the best reputation for manufacturing the most rugged outdoor sporting wear. Approach friends and family, show them both jackets and ask them which one they think is built tougher, stronger, more durable and will be more likely to last the longest. Nine times out of ten, people will say the old, ratty, authentic looking military garb. I guarantee it.

Selling surplus military gear can, for this reason, offer quite an advantage over selling other types of similar items. The advantage, of course, is that you don’t need to convince buyers that your goods are of sufficient quality. If it’s authentic surplus military gear, they already ‘know’ it’s of the best quality available. It may not be the most aesthetically pleasing, or fashionable, but people that are at all interested in purchasing surplus military items don’t care about those kinds of things.

Along with the above mentioned advantage, surplus military goods can also be obtained at very attractive costs and then re-sold to the general public at respectable markups — that is, if you know how and where to obtain such items at source. If you’ve been considering starting your own military surplus store, the first thing I think you should do is to obtain a copy of The Ultimate Surplus Guide by clicking here. Read it from cover to cover to fully familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of finding and purchasing surplus merchandise in lots for resale at the lowest possible cost.

How to start a military surplus storeYou’ll then need to think about things like start-up capital for acquiring stock and obtaining suitable selling space. Some other advantages of starting a military surplus store are that, for one, relatively little capital is needed for acquiring stock compared to other types of merchandise, and secondly, that your selling space doesn’t need to be in a high-rent commercial area of town, nor does your space need to look commercially attractive. People who are interested in purchasing surplus military goods don’t care about what your selling space looks like, and they’re also the type of people that are willing to drive a fair bit out of town in order to dig and pick through your available stock. So, if you can locate a somewhat run-down, but usable, warehouse, let’s say, on the outskirts of town for very little money, such a space is perfectly workable as a military surplus store.

You’ll also need to think about setting an advertising budget for your military surplus store. People need to know it’s actually there before they’ll come and shop for your military surplus items. Fortunately, this also can be relatively inexpensive compared to other industries. You don’t need to build a brand or an image as you would when dealing with other sorts of merchandise, so you don’t need to incur all of the expense that goes along with such involved and complex marketing campaigns. The military equipment is your brand and most of your image. And, exactly what goes along with that has already been established in the minds of the people who will be interested in shopping in your military surplus store. All that’s really needed is to let the people who are already interested in, and actively looking for, military surplus goods know that you exist and where you’re located. Because of this, simple and relatively inexpensive advertising methods tend to work great for a military surplus store. Taking out small ads in local newspapers and supermarket penny-savers can work excellently as a means for advertisement.

These are some of the things you’ll really need to think about in discovering how to start a military surplus store. Of course, I can’t lay it all out, step-by-step, for you here — doing so would, of course, require pages, upon pages, upon pages. So, if you really want to dig deeper into knowing exactly how to start a military surplus store and start in on building a profitable military surplus business for yourself, like I said earlier, I suggest you get yourself a copy of The Ultimate Surplus Guide — I’m sure you’ll find that publication will tell you absolutely everything you’ll need to know to begin doing business in surplus merchandise.

Unique Bid Auction Strategy Tips

Unique Auction Strategy Tips

The most common type of auction — surplus auction or otherwise — is known as a ‘traditional’ or sometimes called an ‘English’ auction. The traditional, or English auction, is what most people tend to think of when they hear the word ‘auction’. Practically everyone is familiar with this style of auction — in a traditional auction, the auction for an item begins at a low price and bidders consecutively bid each other up, raising the bid with each call. The auction ends when nobody is willing to enter a bid higher than the last bid given, and the person who bid that last bid wins the item that’s up for grabs.

A somewhat new and, as of yet, still fairly uncommon, but rapidly growing in popularity, auction type is the ‘unique bid auction.’ Most people are still quite unfamiliar with unique bid auctions. In fact, if you were to ask the average person what a unique bid auction is, it’s very likely they’d have no idea — it’s very likely they’d never have even heard the term before.

Regardless or this, the unique bid auction format, over the last little while, has been gaining in popularity among auctioneers — especially, it seems, when it comes to online electronic auction services.

The goal of bidding in a unique bid auction is to make your bid unique among all the bids placed by all bidders, and have your entirely unique bid also be the lowest of all unique bids placed. So, for example, let’s say an item is up for auction and there are a total of eleven bidders bidding on the available item. All bidders enter their bid, and when all bidders have entered a bid, and the bids are revealed, it turns out that:

  • 2 people bid $1.00
  • 3 people bid $2.00
  • 2 people bid $3.00
  • 1 person bid $4.00
  • 2 people bid $5.00
  • 1 person bid $6.00

In the example above, two people entered a unique bid — a bid amount that nobody else entered. But, in a unique bid auction the winner is the person who placed the lowest unique bid. So, in this case, the person who entered a bid of $4.00 won the item.

As mentioned earlier, unique bid auctions are still quite rare at live auctions, but they’ve been gaining in popularity with online auction sites. The unique bid auction format is still quite new, however, and, as such, many people are still quite unfamiliar with it. And, in order to be consistently successful when taking part in unique bid auctions, a solid bidding strategy can be of tremendous advantage — perhaps being more important than in any other style of auction. Obviously, this can be problematic for the great many people unfamiliar with unique bid auctions. If you’re not familiar with the unique bid auction format, you’re not going to be familiar with effective unique bid auction strategy.

So, here are just a few unique bid auction strategy tips you can use to help improve your results when taking part in a unique bid auction:

Unique Bid Auction Strategy Tip #1

Keep in mind that you’re not really bidding in relation to the retail, or any other, price of the item. — at least not to nearly the degree you would be in other auction methods. This is one of the aspects so unique to the unique bid auction format. You’re really just bidding against the other participant’s bids. At least, that should be the primary focus of your unique bid auction strategy. All you want to get is the lowest bid placed that is also a unique bid. Therefore, it doesn’t really matter that you may be bidding on an item that has a regular retail value of, say, $1,000.00. If you bid just $2.00 for the item and it turns out that nobody else bid $2.00, and nobody else entered a lower unique bid, you win the auction.

Unique Bid Auction Strategy TipsIf you think about this a bit you should be able to see how strategy becomes important in a unique bid auction. If you’re bidding, say, on that $1,000.00 item, you can enter a bid for $1.00 and maybe win the item at an incredible bargain, right? Well… probably not. Why? Because everybody else can do the same which will render your bid not unique and the one guy that bid, let’s say, $100.00 will actually win the auction — as long as his bid was the lowest unique bid entered. And, everybody wants to get the auction at the lowest possible price, right? So, what is the low bid you should enter on that auction? $2.00? $3.00? Other people, also trying to get the lowest bid can also enter such ridiculously low amounts for that $1,000.00 item. So, the lower the bid, the more likely there are to be others who also bid that amount, and thus, the less likely you are to post a unique bid and win the auction at that price. Remember, in order to win your bid must be the lowest bid that is also unique — an amount that nobody else has bid. So, the higher you bid, the more likely it is your bid will be unique, but the higher the likelihood that your bid wont be the lowest unique bid. So, it’s all about pinpointing that perfect range — low enough that you maximize your chances of getting the low bid, but not so low that you minimize your chances of getting a unique bid.

It’s very important to keep in mind, however, that even though I said earlier that you’re not really bidding in relation to the retail price of the item on auction, that doesn’t mean that you don’t have to be cognizant of the item’s worth. It’s still quite important that you know the item you’re bidding on, and know its value. Without knowing the item’s worth it will be easy for you to overbid for the item.

The attraction behind such unique bid auctions is the possibility of actually acquiring highly valuable items for exceedingly little money — like, say, a brand new $1,500.00 TV for perhaps just a few dollars. If you overbid for an item, it entirely defeats the purpose of bidding in unique bid auctions.

Unique Bid Auction Strategy Tip #2

Do not hesitate with your bid. People that are used to bidding in traditional auctions are used to waiting until the auction is nearing the final bid before bidding. This can be a useful strategy in a traditional auction, but it’s of no benefit in a unique bid auction, and can actually diminish your chances of winning the auction.

The reason for this is because it is fairly common in a unique bid auction that nobody actually ends up entering an entirely unique bid — every amount bid was actually entered by at least two or more people. When this happens, it is standard practice in a unique bid auction to give the auction to the person who entered the lowest bid, that had the fewest amount of bids at that price, and was also the person who entered that bid first among all bidders who bid that particular amount. So, try to get your bid in at the earliest possible time.

Unique Bid Auction Strategy Tip #3

Make multiple bids. Virtually all online unique bid auction sites use a system allowing a single person to enter multiple bids on a single auction. One strategy sometimes employed is for a bidder to always enter something very close to the lowest possible bid amount, plus a bid or two, in intervals, in their calculated highest win-probability range. This is referred to as entering a ‘bid spread.’

More information on the nature of unique bid auctions from Wikipedia.

Live Auction Bidding Tips

Live auction bidding tips

Live auctions, like government and military surplus auctions, offer both an enjoyable and an exciting opportunity for people from all walks of life. All manner of various sorts of items are able to be obtained from live auctions that are going on all over the country all the time — and, very often, the items available at these live auctions can be acquired for prices well less than market value. However, if you’ve never been to such an auction, or have attended only a few, you might not be entirely clear on just how to best conduct yourself in order to maximize the potential for successful bidding. You’re looking for some live auction bidding tips. So, in this article, I’ll try to cover some of the basics, and walk you through a few important do’s and don’ts.

Locating Live Auctions to Attend

The very first step you’ll need to take, of course, is actually finding exactly when and where such auctions are going to be taking place. Doing so will either require some amount of research on your part, or you can use the services of a live auction locating service in order to be informed of exactly when and where live auctions will be happening in your area. Such services (such at the one located at this link) will eliminate all of the research and leg work you’ll need to put in to discovering any upcoming auctions that are available to you.

However, if you don’t wish to take advantage of such a service, you can spend some time looking up local auction houses in your area — either in your local phone book, or on the internet — and then contacting them each individually and asking if they have any auctions coming up that are open to the general public. Sometimes, the auction houses will post information regarding upcoming live auctions to their websites. But, since dates can change, and auctions can sometimes be organized very quickly, a lot of times they wont list every auction on the website, and only an actual phone call to the auction house itself, or a visit there, will assure you of the most up to date and complete information.

Along with this, you’ll want to check your local newspaper’s classified sections often and thoroughly, as notices for upcoming auctions will often be posted there. Also, make sure to check any on-line local classifieds websites for your area and make use of online resources like Craiglist.

The Various Auction Types

When you’ve discovered all of the upcoming auctions that are taking place in your area, are open to the public, and you’ve compiled them all into a list, you’ll need to learn the specific rules for the different types of auctions that you wish to attend. This, again, is another area in which the auction locating service mentioned above proves highly valuable. As, along with listing every auction scheduled to take place in your area, the services will also provide you with precise and complete details regarding the rules for each of the auctions to which it informs you. But, again, if you’re not interested in using such a service, you’ll need to contact the organizers of each of the auctions directly and inquire as to the specifics of the individual auction.

It’s common for some auctions to have limited availability and require pre-registration by a certain date, and you’ll need to register before that date if you wish to take part. Many such auctions operate on a first-come-first-serve basis. So, you’ll want to make sure you get that information and register as early as possible in order to secure yourself admittance.

Live auction bidding tipsSome auctions will require an entrance fee. This is usually a relatively small amount, and is usually deductible against any successful bid you place. So, let’s say the entrance fee is $50.00, and you end up winning a bid for an item with a bid of $100.00, the auction house will simply keep your $50.00 entrance fee and require from you just another $50.00 when it comes time to pay for the items you won. They do this because space usually is limited and they want to make sure they fill the limited space with people who are serious about bidding.

Some auctions may require you to enter a larger, entirely refundable deposit as well. This works the same as the deposit described above, except that even if you don’t bid on anything, the money is returned to you at the end of the auction. This is done as a safety measure to guard against people who might obtain the winning bid on an item and, for whatever reason, decide not to pay for it when it comes time to collect the item. Some auctions may require you to provide your credit card information for this purpose, while others may require a cash deposit.

Along with this you may encounter different styles of auctions, and you’ll certainly want to know ahead of time which style the auction you’re attending will be conducted in. The different styles are:

  1. A traditional, or sometimes called an “English” auction. This is the type of auction that most people think about when they hear the word “auction”. It’s the traditional type, where bids start at a low price and bidders ‘bid each other up’ until people stop bidding. The person with the last and highest bid wins the auction.
  2. A Dutch Auction. This is sort of the reverse of an English auction. In a Dutch auction the price for an item starts high and gradually lowers over time until someone places a bid. The first person to place a bid wins the item.
  3. A ‘closed bid’ or a ‘silent auction’. In this type of auction bidders enter the price they’re willing to pay for an item in secret, usually by placing their written bid in a sealed envelope and submitting it. Nobody at the auction knows what anyone else’s bid amount is. After a certain time, the auction stops accepting bids, all envelopes are opened, and whoever submitted the highest price wins the item.

These are the three most common styles of auction you’re likely to encounter. There’s also what’s known as an ‘absolute auction’, which is similar to a closed bid or silent auction, but without any minimum, or reserve, price being set on items.

Live Auction Bidding Tips — Bidding!

One thing you should keep in mind is that, according to the laws in most places, once the auctioneer’s gavel falls, the item is yours. It doesn’t matter if money has exchanged hands or not. When you place a bid and the auctioneer informs you that yours is the winning bid and stops the auction, as far as the law is concerned, you’ve now entered into a legally binding contract with the auctioneer. You now legally owe him the money you agreed to pay, and he now legally owes you the item he agreed to sell you at that price. So, make sure you only ever place a bid if you’re completely willing to pay that amount for that item. Once the auction for an item stops, if you had last bid, then you’re going to have to fork over the money.

The bidding can be conducted very quickly, and it can be confusing for inexperienced attendees. Auctioneers have the right to reject your bid if you seem confused or unsure, and if you’re slow, they wont wait around for you. For this reason it’s advisable that you might want to think about trying to locate a couple of auctions that don’t require non-refundable deposits and where space isn’t very limited, and attend one or two before you even try placing bids, just to get a feel for how things transpire, and for what you can expect when actually bidding.

Live auction tipsDepending on exactly what style of auction it is, and a number of other factors, it can be surprisingly easy for an inexperienced auction attendee to overbid. If you don’t have a lot of experience, the process can be somewhat fast paced and confusing, and it’s not difficult at all to get completely caught up in the excitement of it all. Believe it or not, an auction can be very exciting! There may be times when an inexperienced person enters into a competitive mode — it becomes like a game — a competition, and the desire to just win an auction becomes overwhelming. When this happens there is a real danger that you can overpay for an item. It feels good to win, but if you end up paying more for some item than you could have gotten it for had you bought it retail, that feeling wont last for too long after you leave the auction house.

The surest way of avoiding this is to make sure that you do your homework to the best of your ability. A lot of auctions will publish a list of all of the items that will be made available at the upcoming auction. Obtain that list if you can, as far in advance as possible, learn as much as you can about each item you think you might be interested in bidding on, and do some research into what the items would be worth to you and what the highest you’re willing to bid on the item would realistically be. In a good number of cases the auction house might even set a date before the day of the auction wherein interested parties can view the items that will be made available at the upcoming auction. Take advantage of this if it’s offered and take careful note of the condition of the items. Do as much good research as you can into the real value of the items. Use this information to determine a maximum bid for yourself and stick to it.

Above all, just use a little wisdom and common sense and you’ll likely do just fine and have a lot of fun.

Do you have any of your own live auction bidding tips? If you do please consider sharing them in the comment box below. We’d love to hear your thoughts!

Finding Public Customs Auctions

Customs Auctions - Shipping containers

At the average customs auction, one is quite likely to locate surprising bargains on a wide array of items, providing that the interested buyer does two things correctly. The first thing, of course, is finding out exactly where and when the customs auction is taking place. The second thing is to know as much as you can about the particular items that you’re interested in bidding on.

Conducting a simple online search, using the right search terms, is sure to bring up a host of websites announcing such upcoming customs auctions — almost all of them being open to members of the public. The problem, however, as I’m sure you’ll find if attempting to locate public customs auctions via this method, is that the vast majority of the information you find will very likely be outdated — announcing ‘upcoming customs auctions’ that have already taken place. Internet search engines are great tools for tracking down information. But, due to their nature, they’re often not great tools for ‘timely’ information.

What is a customs auction?

Customs auctions are pretty much what the term implies. Every day in this country border agencies and other customs services seize a wealth of goods that are being imported into the country. The importers may not have gone through the correct channels, or otherwise not properly followed the correct procedures, when attempting to import certain goods into the country. If the matter can not be settled with the importer, for whatever reason, (and it’s not uncommon that it actually can’t), the customs agency will take possession of the goods through seizure. Every so often they will attempt to clear out their stock of such items. They do this, in large part, by holding public customs auctions where such goods are made available to bidders.

Not too long ago a friend of mine, who regularly attends customs auctions, was able to purchase an entire lot of assorted electric lamps at one of these auctions. He managed to place the high bid on the lot at a price of $950.00. The lot contained exactly one-hundred and fifty electric desk lamps — brand new, right from the manufacturer — that regularly retail for $49.95. His cost, per lamp, was about $6.33. Within a week he found a buyer for the entire lot at a price of $3,800.00 — for a total, quick profit of $2,850.00. He could have made a fair bit more if he had chosen to piece the lamps out instead of selling them off all at once, but the opportunity to move them all at once presented itself and he took it. The lamps were being auctioned off in the first place, it seems, merely because an Asian importer had failed to file the proper paperwork, and had failed to follow up with the customs agency in a timely manner. The customs agency had difficulty establishing contact with the importer and, after a time, the items were put up for bid at auction.

Customs AuctionsThere are so many stories like the one above when it comes to these customs auctions, I could literally fill an entire volume of books just relating them. These customs auctions are going on all the time, and a fair number of people are earning a good living from them — just buying and re-selling items they obtain at these customs auctions for a profit. Oddly enough, however, it seems as though not all that many people, in the grand scheme of things, actually know about them. And, of course, even fewer people are aware of how to locate when and where customs auctions, which the’re able to participate in, are actually happening.

How do you find customs auctions?

A lot of people with a casual interest in attending such customs auctions tend to quickly become frustrated if and when attempting to locate them. Such people might hear about such auctions from various sources, become excited about attending one, and simply hit Google, Bing, or some other such search engine in an attempt to locate a customs auction which might be taking place near them at some time in the future. As mentioned above, however, they quickly discover that they need to wade through a sea of useless, outdated information. They quickly become frustrated and give up — usually thinking that finding customs auctions requires some sort of insider information, or special experience or know-how.

So, how do you find customs auctions that you can attend? By far, the most effective way of locating and keeping apprised of any such upcoming auctions in your area (or, any area you choose to apprised of) is to join a qualified auction listing service. Such services keep constant tabs on all public auctions that are taking place around the country. They use their pool of established contacts to maintain extensive and exhaustive lists and notices of any customs auctions, and other types of auctions as well, that are upcoming. The auction listing service will then provide its members with on-line search functionality that will allow you to perform exacting searches by area, time, location, etc. The better services will even allow you search by the specific type of merchandise you’re interested in bidding on. You can also use the listing service to send out e-mail alerts to you whenever an auction is announced to be coming up within the boundaries of a geographical area you specify.

There are a number of such services currently in operation. Here’s a short list of some of the tops ones, listed in order of our recommendation:

As with most people, it’s very likely that you’ve heard of federal government organizations like the Department of Justice’s U.S. Marshals Service, the IRS, the FBI, the ATF, DEA, and many other such agencies, actually seizing things like automobiles, houses, boats, and all sorts of consumer goods and merchandise and then holding auctions to move these items to the highest bidders at public auction for incredibly low prices. Just about everyone knows this goes on. Ask just about anybody and they’ll tell you that they’re aware that such activities are commonplace. Then, ask them if they know how one might go about participating in such customs auctions and they’ll tell you that they have no idea. This is the common experience of most people. Of course, they’d be very surprised to learn that all that is required is to take advantage of one of these qualified auction locating services that will actually do all of the work for them, and they too could be acquiring incredible merchandise at public customs auctions, and a myriad of other types of auctions, at up to 90% off the regular retail price of such goods.

 

How To Make Money with Government Surplus Auctions

How To Make Money with Government Surplus Auctions

Have you ever found yourself with a curiosity about making money by purchasing items at auction at low prices and then re-selling those items at a profit? It is, in fact, somewhat surprising just how popular this notion appears to be. In fact, to a fairly large number of people, the thrill of obtaining interesting items at auction for low prices, just in itself, seems like both a fun and interesting endeavor. And, if truth be told, flipping those items that you manage to acquire at auction for a profit is a good way of making money — one that you could even easily turn into either a lucrative part-time, or even full-time business for yourself.

Indeed, there are quite a number of people out there, right now, who are earning substantial incomes doing just that. They attend government surplus auctions, bid on the items up for grabs, and actually have loads of fun doing it. They then turn around and flip the items they’ve won through channels like eBay, or even through local classified advertisements, or a number of other channels. Not everyone has the time to attend government surplus auctions — nor the know-how required in locating them, or how to participate in them. So, if you can obtain items by placing winning bids at, say, a 500% discount over what the fair-market resale price is for such a used item (which isn’t all that difficult to do at a government surplus auction) you can mark-up the item by, say, 400% over your bid price, and still sell it off to a buyer for, what would be to them, a substantial discount.

For the purposes of illustration, using the above the figures, let’s say you managed to obtain the fictional product of a ‘widget’ at auction. A used widget in good condition regularly sells for about $1,000.00. You, however, won your widget for a 500% discount below that price. That means you will have spent only $200.00 to acquire your widget. You then mark-up your resale price by 400% and advertise your widget for sale at a price of $800.00. A buyer, paying your full asking price, would still be purchasing your widget at a savings of $200.00 below what they could normally find used widgets selling for. And, you’ve still made a profit of $600.00! The reason for this is because the ‘fair-market resale value’ of used merchandise is based, for the most part, on the prices of used items that have originally come from retail sources — not from surplus sources. And, retail sources begin with a higher cost for most merchandise.

The used widgets, in our fictional example, that most people are used to seeing for sale, are priced on average at $1,000.00, because almost all of these widgets are being re-sold by people who originally purchased the widgets at retail — not through surplus auctions. The bulk of those widgets being resold, therefore, are being resold for less than what the seller actually paid to acquire the widget in the first place, and the seller is attempting to recoup as much of their original purchase price as they can. This is what dictates the average resale value of a used widget.

So, how can you get involved in making money with government surplus auctions? Of course, the very first thing you’ll need to do is to actually find such auctions that are taking place in your area. Practically anywhere you might live, there are most likely many such auctions taking place relatively close to you on a regular basis. The problem is — and this is one of the reasons why not a lot of people take part in these auctions — is that the auctions usually aren’t well publicized. And, there’s a reason for that. The entire thing about these auctions is that the people who do attend them are looking for great deals — and the agencies that hold such auctions are looking to dump their surplus inventories quickly. That’s exactly why they sell this stuff through an auction format — their primary concern is to get rid of the stuff fast, and they do this by selling it all in one go, at auction, for very little money. Of course, doing it this way, however, while it does work to unload their surplus inventory quickly, it doesn’t result in huge profits for the agency when each auction is assessed individually. So, the agencies have an interest in keeping costs low in order to maximize their returns. And, publicity for the auctions cost money.

It’s not bad for them, however, because there are a dedicated group of regulars who attend these auctions, who will put forth the effort to hunt down the auctions and find them. And, that’s all the agencies really need — just this dedicated group. Because, of course, this dedicated group are made up mostly of re-sellers — so, they buy and buy and buy. If you get into attending these government surplus auctions on something of a regular basis, one of the first things you’ll notice is that you’ll see the same faces at many of these auctions, over and over again. And, by actually not widely publicizing government surplus auctions, it works out better for the agencies holding the auctions.

Remember, the primary concern of the agencies that are holding the government surplus auctions is to unload their surplus inventory quickly in order to make room for new inventory, and to rid themselves of the associated costs and efforts in storing their surplus goods. If the auctions are well publicized, a lot of regular folk will attend and that will drive the prices up. More people attending means more bids — more bidding wars. Which means the individual auction lots end up selling for more money. It’s kind of counter-intuitive, I know. You may think that would be desirable for the agency selling the items. But, it’s not! The higher prices drive away the professional buyers.

Hot to make money with government surplus auctions

The professional buyers are there to acquire stuff cheap for the purpose of turning a profit — they’re there to acquire LOTS of stuff. If they can’t obtain the items at prices that make it worth their while, they’ll go away, and the agencies will be left with a room full of average joes looking to spend a hundred bucks or so to get their hands on one or two items. The agencies don’t want that. They want professional buyers who have business channels set-up to quickly move all the items they can get their hands on. Because, even though these professional buyers will buy more cheaply on a per-item basis, they still buy, and buy, and buy, and buy. And, they will buy items that casual buyers just wont bid on — pallets full of industrial machine parts, and what have you — because the professional buyers have the contacts and the means to resell such items. Casual buyers — members of the general public — just don’t. They have no interest in acquiring such things.

So, if by over publicizing such auctions the agency drives away the professional buyers and are left with a room full of average people — people who merely saw an ad somewhere and decided to go and try to grab a bargain or two on some piece of merchandise they might want to acquire for their own use, there’s a much greater chance the auction is going to conclude and that the agency conducting the auction, while, on a per-item basis having received higher prices on the items that did sell than they otherwise would have, are left stuck with a ton of excess goods that didn’t move. And, this is exactly what the agency doesn’t want. They want rid of the stuff. They don’t want to have to deal with it any longer. They need to make room. That is their primary concern.

Due to this tendency to under-publicize these auctions, most people don’t have time, dedication and know-how that’s required to hunt them down and discover exactly when and where these auctions are taking place. They might attend one if they, by chance, happen across a small notice in their local paper, or something. But they wont go out of their way to actually seek out the information — which is what is required, really, if you wish to attend these auctions on anything approaching a regular basis.

So, what must you do to put forth the effort in actually locating these auctions? Well, there really are two methods. You can do all of the footwork yourself — keep browsing the classified sections by daily routine in local papers, find and contact auction services that handle such auctions on a regular basis and ask them to notify you of any scheduled auctions, and do the same with the government agencies directly. Or, you could incorporate the services of an organization that does all of that work for you. Services such as the one located here.

Such a service will provide you with a comprehensive and frequently updated database of all upcoming government surplus auctions that are scheduled to take place in your specific area. You can set the service to notify you through e-mail whenever a new auction, in any area you specify, has been scheduled. Or, you can search through their database any time you choose. Their service will provide you with dates, times, locations, contact information for representatives involved in running the auctions, and in most cases even detailed and comprehensive listings of the specific items that will be available for bidding on at those auctions. You can even browse the auction listing by state, or conduct searches based on Zip code and choose to have results returned based on a specific radius in which you’re willing to travel to in order to attend such government surplus auctions.

How to win penny auction strategy tipsThe particular government surplus auction locating service mentioned above, that you can visit by clicking here, will even allow you to search by a specific item that you’re interested in and will then return results for any upcoming auction that is selling that item — it will provide you with the date, location, information you need to know about the auction itself, and specific, detailed information regarding the particular item that’s up for sale. Along with that, they maintain a nationwide database of foreclosure and pre-foreclosure properties — if you’re interested in purchasing real-estate at surplus auction prices. They also provide a wealth of educational materials — including a library of videos of actual surplus auctions being conducted — in order to familiarize you with the process of taking part in a government surplus auction. They maintain a list of recent surplus auction results and sale prices — providing you with an idea of what to expect to pay in order to actually win bids at any auction you might be interested in attending. A good auction locating service, such as the one linked to above, will provide all of these features and more.

There’s no doubt at all that making money with government surplus auctions is a very workable avenue toward real revenue generation for just about any individual. And, there’s also no doubt that taking advantage of a qualified locating service is practically a must for anyone with an interest in really making money with government surplus auctions on a regular basis.